Germany had become a nation of walkers. Men, women, children and the infirm all at some point in time and across the formerly spacious Reich left their homes, shoppes and places of worship toward the center or west of Germany. The sins committed by fathers and sons of Germany had come home, and many faced a fork in the road of their lives: Suicide and a quick death, or run, and stave off death at least for a little while. In After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation attempts to bring this dark and turbulent era of peace to light in hopes of putting a mirror to the faces of an overly righteous east and west.

While conventional knowledge of the Russian atrocities in Berlin and elsewhere was widely available and shared during the Cold War, less discussed, if known, was the atrocities committed by French, English and American soldiers against the occupied populous from the time of Germany’s surrender through the creation of the West German state in the late 1940s. To be sure, on scale alone, Russia’s crimes against the German people are of a magnitude unmatched elsewhere in continental history since perhaps the 30 Years War.

MacDonogh is adept at exploring and interweaving the Macro and the Mico scale of destruction that permeated not just from an economic perspective, but also the fraying of the cultural fabric of German society. For example, the assault of German women was also compounded by the fact that many women were later forced to commoditize their bodies in order to procure goods for their families that they needed to survive. This begrudged the German men, if any were left, and had an emasculating effect that likely put strains on thousands of post war marriages.

In addition, through utilizing personal narratives, MacDonogh is skillfully able to create a complex portrait of persons and places that provides a human face to the occupation while not neglecting the need to examine the topic in a broad, generally readable, manner.

                At the risk of stating the obvious, any academic student will quickly realize that it is inherently difficult to create a broad and stimulating historical examination of a period of time that occupies the better part of a decade and spans several countries and hundreds of historical actors. The author does his best, but by the time the reader reaches the occupation of Austria, the intellectual and emotional reserves are run thin. This is unfortunate, because the occupation of former Hapsburg lands is almost more interesting than the increasingly homogenized Germany. When occupying forces entered the west and east of the countries, respectively, they happened upon a country filled with deportees from the east as well as Slovenes, Croats, Italians as well as native Austrians.

In many cases, the German speaking evacuees had been forcibly put on trains or forced to walk the hundreds if not thousands of miles to the Austrian border while experiencing every conceivable type of deprivation and denigration. This presented a complex issue to the three occupying nations (UK, USA, USSR), who approached their occupying duty in Austria with varying degrees of enthusiasm. The English were bored, the Americans were confused, and the Russians mainly concerned with shipping everything of industrial or economic value back to the charred and destroyed areas in the east. This is in stark contrast to the attitudes of the occupiers of Germany proper, where the attitudes of the Big Three were almost uniformly punitive. It is a shame that Macdonogh does not spend more time on this analysis, as he becomes more involved in presenting an ever growing and wearying amount of evidence of Allied crimes.

Another particularly jarring moment is the oft overlooked (or purposefully hidden) role of the English troops in ‘repatriating’ Cossack troops who had fought under German flag against Bolshevik’s, but as Stalin made clear, they were still citizens of his Soviet Union and therefore his to deal with. This in effect was a mass deportation of men but also their women and children to the east and an almost certain death. A slightly moving if romanticized moment occurs when the German commander of the Cossacks, Helmut Von Pannwitz, chooses to go to Russia with the rest of the men under his command, though strictly speaking as a Wehrmacht officer in British custody he was not forced to go with them. Macdonogh masterfully shows the connections that people make during wartime that have long reverberating effects. Pannwitz was summarily shot in Moscow upon his arrival for crimes against the Slavs in Yugoslavia. The casualness with which death was meted out after the supposed peace is one of the great unmentioned themes of the Macdonogh’s work, and is the element that sticks with the reader the most after conclusion.

The race to the finish of a conflict often includes a frenzied period of violence in advance of the coming peace. Before the guns went silent on the eleventh hour on the eleventh day on the eleventh month in the last Great War, the artillery from both sides rang constantly, hoping to add one more body to the enemy’s cemeteries and wastelands. In the second war, violence of that sort continued unabated long after the ink on the losers signed documents went dry. If anything, Macdonogh show readers that assault, looting and murder petered out only after the perpetrators appetite, whetted by 6 years of deprivation, had been satiated.

In the west, the narrative shown to school children and uninformed adults is one of monastically abstinent American and British soldiers entering a benighted Germany, grateful for their carpet bombings and ‘liberating’ them from their possessions and in some cases, lives. Instead, what Macdonogh shows is that brutality is not party to one nation or one side. Instead it is a crime that makes even victors become villains.

Recommended for readers familiar with Central European social history and revisionist narratives.

  After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation by Giles MacDonogh. Basic Books USA: 2007. 656 Pages.  Purchased copy.

Pretty neat graph here from FRED, showing the conventional gas price by week since 1990. Shaded areas are periods of US recession.

Despite the huge dropoff in oil costs as a result of the Great Recession, prices are more on target to keep their general upward trend for the forseeable future. Blame this on the rising energy consumption of not just China, but India and southern Asia in general, which has steadily become the textiles manufacturer of the world.

The main reason things will be okay is that a growing demand for energy transaltes into a growing demand for other commodities.  Oil prices increase because more people are getting jobs and commuting to work instead of staying in their moms basement. Similarly, when they go to these jobs they earn incomes which then translate as consumer goods purchased. All this takes energy.

Every week I listen to Slate Magazine’s Political Gabfest. I always look forward to what the three hosts, David Plotz, John Dickerson, and Emily Bazelon, include at the end of the podcast for their topics of conversation at their weekly cocktail parties. Being a fan of both cocktail chatter and cocktail parties, I decided to riff on that theme and add my weekly top three stories that I think would be great conversation pieces at weekly cocktail parties.

  1. Abraham Lincoln was also a pardon hunter.
  2. Chats with Adam Pally of Happy Endings.
  3. Tom Hardy’s Star Trek: Nemesis screentest is better than the actual film.

 

When it turned out that Johann Hari had attributed quotes from his interviewee’s books to the actual conversations he was having with them, and then used those quotes out of context in his articles for the Independent newspaper, I was naturally befuddled. How could a young man of incredible talent, who had been awarded the Orwell Prize for his journalism in the Congo, be a fabricator?

I made peace with it and hoped that one day Hari would be able to share his gift with all of the Anglophone world again.

I hadn’t thought much of journalistic plagiarism after that point, at least until this last week when New Yorker writer and neuroscience wunderkind Jonah Lehrer quit his job with the aforementioned publication after it came to light that he had fabricated quotes he attributed to Bob Dylan. Yep, that’s right, Bobby Zimmerman.

What these two young men have in common is both have achieved an unprecedented level of professional accolades so early in their career, and have been pushed to keep publishing . Of course I don’t mean to in any way say that what they did was excusable—It wasn’t and isn’t.

I just mean to say that I understand, at least in the Lehrer case, of a lie that became bigger than it was supposed to be and that ultimately ended up hurting a lot of people. If that is in fact the case what happened with Lehrer, I think that a lot of people have done said and done things they regret (myself included), but that’s part of why being in the public sphere is such a big deal; we hold these persons to a higher level of accountability in part to show that our own society is marginally redeemable for the sins others commit.

That sounds like a lot of hyperbole probably, but its important to remember that when we hold people up, that we’re doing so for the right reasons, and that they also recognize their responsibility to the rest of us.

Every week I listen to Slate Magazine’s Political Gabfest. I always look forward to what the three hosts, David Plotz, John Dickerson, and Emily Bazelon, include at the end of the podcast for their topics of conversation at their weekly cocktail parties. Being a fan of both cocktail chatter and cocktail parties, I decided to riff on that theme and add my weekly top three stories that I think would be great conversation pieces at weekly cocktail parties.

  1. Kristen Stewart broke Rob Pattinson’s heart.
  2. Tennis play Conan.
  3. Those minions are getting their own movie.

Every week I listen to Slate Magazine’s Political Gabfest. I always look forward to what the three hosts, David Plotz, John Dickerson, and Emily Bazelon, include at the end of the podcast for their topics of conversation at their weekly cocktail parties. Being a fan of both cocktail chatter and cocktail parties, I decided to riff on that theme and add my weekly top three stories that I think would be great conversation pieces at weekly cocktail parties.

  1. Andrew Sullivan still refuses to drive.
  2. Louis CK un-defends Daniel Tosh.
  3. Christopher Nolan and his fanboys.

Every week I listen to Slate Magazine’s Political Gabfest. I always look forward to what the three hosts, David Plotz, John Dickerson, and Emily Bazelon, include at the end of the podcast for their topics of conversation at their weekly cocktail parties. Being a fan of both cocktail chatter and cocktail parties, I decided to riff on that theme and add my weekly top three stories that I think would be great conversation pieces at weekly cocktail parties.

  1. Re-upping Spencer Ackerman’s diatribe against the Beltway.
  2. Where in the world is Jesse Jackson Jr.?
  3. The Sons of Anarchy season 5 trailer is here.